A long quote for the day.

25 04 2011

“If overfed teachers aren’t the causes or beneficiaries of increased tuition (as they’ve been depicted of late), then perhaps it’s worth looking up the food chain. As faculty jobs have become increasingly contingent and precarious, administration has become anything but. Formerly, administrators were more or less teachers with added responsibilities; nowadays, they function more like standard corporate managers—and they’re paid like them too. Once a few entrepreneurial schools made this switch, market pressures compelled the rest to follow the high-revenue model, which leads directly to high salaries for in-demand administrators. Even at nonprofit schools, top-level administrators and financial managers pull down six- and seven-figure salaries, more on par with their industry counterparts than with their fellow faculty members. And while the proportion of tenure-track teaching faculty has dwindled, the number of managers has skyrocketed in both relative and absolute terms. If current trends continue, the Department of Education estimates that by 2014 there will be more administrators than instructors at American four-year nonprofit colleges. A bigger administration also consumes a larger portion of available funds, so it’s unsurprising that budget shares for instruction and student services have dipped over the past fifteen years.”

– Malcolm Harris, “Bad Education,” n+1, April 25, 2011.

Read the whole thing, but be warned that it’s absolutely terrifying.


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25 04 2011
Middle Seaman

Without reading the whole writeup, we live it daily. Even presidents of religiously controlled schools, e.g. Jesuit Georgetown in DC, pay their presidents money they don’t deserve. Another process that passed us in the speed of lie was deans becoming, mainly, CEOs of schools.

At least from my perspective, these people are free loaders; the university doesn’t get any better and the requirements are bizarre and pointless.

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